Frequently asked questions

How experienced is Professor McWhinnie?


Professor McWhinnie graduated and qualified in 1977. He has over 40 years experience in surgical practice.




Do I need to consult my GP before a consultation/procedure?


It is possible to make a self-referral for a consultation and go ahead with a procedure on this basis. If you have private medical insurance please check with your insurer if a GP referral for consultation is required.




Is the initial consultation with Professor McWhinnie?


Yes always. A medical history will be taken, your condition and options discussed and the opportunity given for you to ask any questions you may have.




What happens following the initial consultation?


After consultation you may require further investigations, no further treatment, or plan to go ahead with your procedure. Professor McWhinnie will provide relevant information for all of these options.




How do I book a consultation with Professor McWhinnie?


The best way to book a consultation is to use the contact form below or feel free to call us on +44 (0)7578 630033. Alternatively call The Saxon Clinic on 01908 665533.




Where was Professor McWhinnie educated?


Professor McWhinnie graduated the University of Glasgow with an M.B. ChB in 1977 and completed his Doctor of Medicine (MD) at the University of Oxford in 1987. He is currently Professor and Postgraduate Dean of the University of Buckingham sharing his 40 years of experience with the new generation of doctors.





Frequently asked questions

How experienced is Professor McWhinnie?


Professor McWhinnie graduated and qualified in 1977. He has over 40 years experience in surgical practice.




Do I need to consult my GP before a consultation/procedure?


It is possible to make a self-referral for a consultation and go ahead with a procedure on this basis. If you have private medical insurance please check with your insurer if a GP referral for consultation is required.




Is the initial consultation with Professor McWhinnie?


Yes always. A medical history will be taken, your condition and options discussed and the opportunity given for you to ask any questions you may have.




What happens following the initial consultation?


After consultation you may require further investigations, no further treatment, or plan to go ahead with your procedure. Professor McWhinnie will provide relevant information for all of these options.




How do I book a consultation with Professor McWhinnie?


The best way to book a consultation is to use the contact form below or feel free to call us on +44 (0)7578 630033. Alternatively call The Saxon Clinic on 01908 665533.




Where was Professor McWhinnie educated?


Professor McWhinnie graduated the University of Glasgow with an M.B. ChB in 1977 and completed his Doctor of Medicine (MD) at the University of Oxford in 1987. He is currently Professor and Postgraduate Dean of the University of Buckingham sharing his 40 years of experience with the new generation of doctors.





Frequently asked questions

How experienced is Professor McWhinnie?


Professor McWhinnie graduated and qualified in 1977. He has over 40 years experience in surgical practice.




Do I need to consult my GP before a consultation/procedure?


It is possible to make a self-referral for a consultation and go ahead with a procedure on this basis. If you have private medical insurance please check with your insurer if a GP referral for consultation is required.




Is the initial consultation with Professor McWhinnie?


Yes always. A medical history will be taken, your condition and options discussed and the opportunity given for you to ask any questions you may have.




What happens following the initial consultation?


After consultation you may require further investigations, no further treatment, or plan to go ahead with your procedure. Professor McWhinnie will provide relevant information for all of these options.




How do I book a consultation with Professor McWhinnie?


The best way to book a consultation is to use the contact form below or feel free to call us on +44 (0)7578 630033. Alternatively call The Saxon Clinic on 01908 665533.




Where was Professor McWhinnie educated?


Professor McWhinnie graduated the University of Glasgow with an M.B. ChB in 1977 and completed his Doctor of Medicine (MD) at the University of Oxford in 1987. He is currently Professor and Postgraduate Dean of the University of Buckingham sharing his 40 years of experience with the new generation of doctors.





Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (Gallbladder Surgery)

Professor McWhinnie has over 25 years’ experience of laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery (gallbladder removal) and has carried out several thousand cases. He was a pioneer of day case surgery for this procedure in the UK.

What is a laparoscopic cholecystectomy?


It is the removal of your gallbladder by keyhole surgery. Your gallbladder is not an essential organ. If it is removed, bile flows to your intestines directly from your liver and digestion continues as normal. Laparoscopic surgery is where several small incisions are made, rather than one large one and is also known as ‘keyhole’ surgery.




Why should my gallbladder be removed?


Gallbladder removal is indicated when you have gallstones causing pain or inflammation in your gallbladder.




What are the benefits of this laparoscopic surgery?


The benefits of having your gallbladder removed by the laparoscopic method include: less pain after surgery, shorter hospital stay, earlier return to full activity and work, less visible abdominal scars.




Are there any alternative treatments?


Open cholecystectomy, where a large incision is made, is still performed in some acute cases. It is also needed in five percent of laparoscopic cases if there is unexpected inflammation and scar tissue.




What are the risks of having a laparoscopic cholecystectomy?


There are generic risks associated with any surgery and these comprise bleeding and infection. The specific risks of this surgery include unintentional damage to a bile duct in a small number of cases and further details will be explained to you before asking you to sign the consent form. Please ask questions if you are uncertain.




How long will I be in hospital for?


You will usually come in to hospital on the day of your surgery and return home at the end of the same day.




Will I feel any pain?


You should expect some discomfort after the operation in the abdomen and around the incision sites but you will be given pain relief for this. You might have short-lived pain in one or both shoulders. This is caused by irritation to your diaphragm by the CO2 gas used to distend the abdomen during laparoscopic surgery. It is important that you take your painkillers on a regular basis for the first few days.




What happens to my gallbladder?


The gallbladder will be sent to the pathologist for examination. Your doctor will receive a full report from the pathologist after one to two weeks. If there are any further issues that need to be addressed you will be advised at your post-operative consultation.




When can I return to normal activities?


It is important that you start to mobilise gently immediately after surgery. Most people return to work within one to two weeks although in some patients a feeling of fatigue can persist for up to 3 weeks. Please avoid vigorous exercise, for 10 to 15 days. You will have some plastic dressings on your wound. These will fall off after about 10 days. You can wash your body, but keep your wounds completely dry for the first 24 hours after your surgery. Avoid having a bath or swimming within the first week, as soaking your wounds in water increases the likelihood of infection. You may have a shower within this time, but please avoid the water spraying directly on your wounds. After the first week, you can have a bath or shower as normal, but please keep your wounds clean and dry at all other times.





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